Photographically speaking, what is your 7 Iron?

Andrew Beck Andrew Leave a Comment

Hang on a minute – a golf related post on a photographic blog? Well, at first it might sound strange but if you think about it, Golfers and Photographers have quite a bit in common.

For one, both of us like to carry large amounts of excess luggage onto domestic and international flights. The difference with photographers is that airline staff will literally need to rip the the camera bag off a photographers back before it go’s anywhere but in the overhead storage compartment!

When you think about it, a golfers bag is not too different from a photographers bag. Both contain tools of the trade with each having being designed for a specific purpose or scenario. Our bags will often be riddled with gadgets and memory card wallets but ultimately it comes down to a camera body and, the most important component, the lens. Somewhere in each and every one of our camera bags, amongst the plethora of gadgets and cleaning cloths,  lies the mystical ” 7 Iron”…

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Professional golfers will always be able to tell you what their favourite club in their bag is. Sometimes this may not even be the right club for the shot based on the distances or lie of the ball, but ineveitably, the pro feels so comfortable with this single club that he would rather play the shot with it. The theoretical “7 Iron” is that go-to club, or in the case of  a wildlife photographer, the go-to lens.

What is your photographic equivalent of the “7 Iron”?

  • That piece of equipment that you would rescue from a burning building before all other items…
  • That one lens that you just know will provide the desired results time and time again…
  • That lens that allows you to focus on getting the shot without having to worry about focal length issues…
  • That lens that provides tack sharp images without fail…
  • The holy grail of all lenses in YOUR bag…

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Leave us a comment  and let us know what YOUR 7 Iron is…

Comments 0

  1. Morkel Erasmus

    I think most will say the 70-200mm f2.8…
    I would too…and then add that I wish I had a 200-400mm which should fill that niche.
    But looking at the majority of my wildlife photos my 500mm has never let me down, irrespective of the constraints imposed by a fixed focal length lens.

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